Catalyst Total T4 Test

The total T4 slide for Catalyst One and Catalyst Dx chemistry analyzers

Always include the Catalyst Total T4 Test when running blood work on a senior dog or cat.

1 in 7 profiles run on seemingly healthy adult dogs show a low total T4 result, indicating hypothyroidism or a nonthyroidal illness.1

1 in 10 cats will be affected by hyperthyroidism in their lifetime.2

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Research

JVIM Publication: In-house accuracy compares favorably to reference laboratory

Dr. Graham Bilbrough’s blog post shares details on research published in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine. It shows that in-house TT4 testing can be as accurate as reference laboratory testing.3,4

Testing Guidelines

Learn what to do next with your total T4 results for canine and feline patients.

 

Watch these short videos in which Dr. Graham Bilbrough discusses total T4 results, treatment, and monitoring for canine and feline patients.

Total T4 Canine Hyperthyroidism
Total T4 Feline Hyperthyroidism
 

How to Use


View of whole blood separator and slides added to the Catalyst One analyzer
How to Run at Total T4 Test

It takes just seconds to add the Catalyst Total T4 Test to your profiles for a comprehensive look at your patients' thyroid health.

 
Storage and Handling Requirements
  • Store in the refrigerator. Do not freeze.
  • No warming required—run directly from the refrigerator.
  • Total T4 (TT4) slides and reagent can be stored in their pouch at room temperature for up to 8 hours. After 8 hours, store any unused materials in the refrigerator. Do not cycle more than 5 times.
  • Can be run on whole blood, serum, or plasma. Recommended sample volume:
    • Whole blood: 600–800 μL
    • Serum/plasma: 65 μL (300 μL if running with other slides)
Frequently Asked Questions

Answers to the most frequently asked questions about using the Catalyst Total T4 Test

 

Resources

Feline Hyperthyroidism

File Icon  What every clinician should know about feline thyroid disease


File Icon  Learn how to interpret the results of the Catalyst Total T4 Test and how they relate to the diagnosis of feline hyperthyroidism. Watch snippet now

Canine Hypothyroidism

File Icon  What every clinician should know about canine thyroid disease


File Icon  Learn how to interpret the results of the Catalyst Total T4 Test and how they relate to the diagnosis of canine hypothyroidism. Watch snippet now

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  1. Results from 8,238 canine patient samples run in-clinic, where “wellness” was selected as the reason for testing. Data on file at IDEXX Laboratories, Inc. Westbrook, Maine USA.
  2. Peterson ME. Hyperthyroidism in cats: what’s causing this epidemic of thyroid disease and can we prevent it? J Feline Med Surg. 2012;14(11):804–818.
  3. Wolff E, Bilbrough G, Moore G, Lynn L, Murphy R, Scott-Moncrieff C. A side-by-side comparison of two assays for measuring canine and feline total thyroxine (TT4) [abstract ESVE-P-7]. J Vet Intern Med. In press.
  4. Peterson ME, Rishniw M, Bilbrough GE. Validation of an in-clinic point-of-care immunoassay for measurement of total thyroxine (TT4) concentration in serum from euthyroid and hyperthyroid cats [abstract ESVE-P-1]. J Vet Intern Med. In press.