SNAP® Parvo Test

A definitive diagnosis provides clinical confidence

 

The SNAP® Parvo Test has been shown not to cross-react with modified live vaccines*—so you can have confidence in the accuracy of your diagnosis and the treatment decisions you make. Early and definitive identification of canine parvovirus allows for timely and appropriate treatment.

 

*
Study conducted using modified live vaccines only. Killed vaccines do not replicate in the gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Data on file at IDEXX Laboratories.
SNAP Parvo Test

Early detection for timely treatment

  • Pet–side results in 8 minutes
  • 5 tests per package
  • Room temperature storage

The IDEXX Test Promise—If an IDEXX test does not perform as promised, simply call us and we will credit your IDEXX Points account with 100% of the test’s value in points. If you have questions about the IDEXX Test Promise, please call us at 1–800–248–2483.

Sensitivity and specificity of the SNAP® Parvo Test

Parvo Vaccine Cross-reactivity—In a recent study conducted by the University of Wisconsin, of 64 dogs vaccinated with six different modified live CPV-2 vaccines, the SNAP Parvo Test did not detect CPV-2 in their feces:1

A population of 64 beagles with low or no antibody to canine parvovirus-2 (CPV-2) were vaccinated with one of five different combination vaccines (Duramune® Max 5, Ft. Dodge Animal Health; Progard® 5, Intervet; Vanguard® Plus 5/L, Pfizer Animal Health; Recombitek® C4, Merial; Galaxy® DA2PPv, Schering-Plough Animal Health) or one monovalent product (NEOPAR®, NEOTECH LLC) containing modified live CPV-2 vaccine. Fecal samples were collected on day 0 and on one or more of the following days: 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 postvaccination. All samples were tested for CPV-2 using the SNAP Parvo Test. No cross-reactivity was detected.

 

Reference:
1.
Schultz RD, Larson LJ, Lorentzen LP. Effects of modified live canine parvovirus vaccine on the SNAP ELISA antigen assay. Paper presented at: International Veterinary Emergency Critical Symposium; September 18–21, 2008; Phoenix, Arizona, USA.

Resources and support materials for the SNAP® Parvo Test

It’s easy to use the SNAP Parvo Test:
1.
Swab sample and place swab tip into tube. Bend bulb to break seal and release conjugate.
2.
Squeeze and release bulb 3 times to mix sample and conjugate.
3.
Squeeze bulb to dispense 5 drops into the sample well of a SNAP® device.
4.
When color first appears in the activation circle, press firmly to activate. You will hear a distinct “snap.”
5.
Read the test result
8 minutes from the time of activation.

View the package insert (PDF) for detailed instructions.

Interpreting Results:

Positive Result

Color development in the sample spot that is darker than the negative control indicates a positive result, and the presence of parvovirus antigen in the sample.

Negative Result

Color development only in the positive control spot indicates a negative result.

Invalid Results

  • Negative Control (safeguard against false–positives)—If color in the negative control spot is equal to or darker than the color in the sample spot, the result is invalid and the sample should be retested.
  • No Color Development—If the positive control does not develop color, repeat the test.
  • Background—If the sample is allowed to flow past the activation circle, background color may result. Some background color is normal. However, if colored background obscures the test result, repeat the test.

Questions and answers about the SNAP® Parvo Test

 

Can samples be collected directly from the patient?

No. The swab collection device is intended for use on external fecal samples only.

 

My SNAP Parvo Test has been out of the foil package for the day. Can I still use it?

The SNAP Parvo Test, and any other SNAP® test, must be used within two hours of removing it from the foil package.

 

Will vaccination interfere with the SNAP Parvo Test results?

In a recent study conducted by the University of Wisconsin, of 64 dogs vaccinated with six different modified live CPV–2 vaccines, the SNAP® Parvovirus Antigen Test did not detect CPV–2 in their feces.1

A population of 64 beagles with low or no antibody to canine parvovirus-2 (CPV-2) were vaccinated with one of five different combination vaccines (Duramune® Max 5, Ft. Dodge Animal Health; Progard® 5, Intervet; Vanguard® Plus 5/L, Pfizer Animal Health; Recombitek® C4, Merial; Galaxy® DA2PPv, Schering-Plough Animal Health) or one monovalent product (NEOPAR®, NEOTECH LLC) containing modified live CPV-2 vaccine. Fecal samples were collected on day 0 and on one or more of the following days: 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 postvaccination. All samples were tested for CPV-2 using the SNAP Parvo Test. No cross-reactivity was detected.

Read abstract > (PDF)

You have indicated before that the SNAP Parvo Test may cross react 4–15 days post vaccination. Why is the information different now?

The information we derived from studies performed in the 1990s did indicate that there may be a potential interference with vaccinated canines 4–15 days post vaccination with other available assays. However, this recent University of Wisconsin study has shown that the SNAP® Parvo Test does not detect CPV-2 in canine feces.

 

Reference:
1. Schultz RD, Larson LJ, Lorentzen LP. Effects of modified live canine parvovirus vaccine on the SNAP ELISA antigen assay. Paper presented at: International Veterinary Emergency Critical Symposium; September 18–21, 2008; Phoenix, Arizona, USA.

 

Which CPV (canine parvovirus) strain is detected in the SNAP Parvo Test?

The SNAP Parvo Test detects these strains: CPV-1, CPV-2, CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c.

 

Does the SNAP Parvo Test detect CPV-2c?

  • A recent abstract published (PDF) at the 2007 Conference for Research Workers in Animal Disease by Dr. Ron Schultz of the University of Wisconsin has shown that the SNAP Parvo Test does detect CPV-2c.
  • CPV-2c is an emerging strain of the canine parvovirus that has only recently been introduced into the United States (2004–2005), most likely from Europe, where it has been since 2001.
  • IDEXX continues to conduct studies to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the SNAP Parvo Test with this strain.

 

Can I test stool from a deceased dog?

IDEXX doesn’t have the data to support the results of samples taken from a deceased dog. Our validation studies were performed with samples from live dogs.

 

Can I detect feline panleukopenia?

IDEXX doesn’t have the data to support these results as our validation studies were performed with canine samples only

 

Can I test vomitus?

IDEXX doesn’t have the data to support these results as our validation studies were performed with canine fecal samples only.

 

Does the test cross react with other coronaviruses?

No. The SNAP Parvo Tests are very specific for canine parvovirus (CPV); there is no cross–reaction with other enteric pathogens.

 

I tested a parvovirus symptomatic dog and it was negative on the SNAP Parvo Test. Why did I receive this result?

The dog may have been past its “shed window.”

“The shed window for CPV is typically highest day 4 to day 14 post exposure. Viral shedding in the feces commences approximately 4 days after infection and reaches a peak about the time clinical signs first occur. Virus shedding begins to wane by day 8–12 (post infection). And is usually absent by day 14–15. It is important, therefore, to collect feces for viral detection at the onset of clinical illness.”1

Alternatively, the animal may have another condition that causes symptoms similar to that of parvovirus (e.g., fecal parasites, “garbage can” enteritis, canine coronavirus, and canine distemper).

 

Reference:
1. Mason GD. Good business, good medicine: Use diagnostics to help confirm parvo. DVM. March 1, 1999.

 

What is the sensitivity and specificity of the SNAP Parvo Test?

The sensitivity and specificity of the SNAP Parvo Test for the population tested are:

  • Sensitivity = 100%
  • Specificity = 100%

As compared to Probe Test:

  • Sensitivity = 100%
  • Specificity = 98%

Sensitivity and Specificity of the SNAP Parvo Test

 

Can squeezing the conjugate bulb more than 3 times affect results?

Yes. If the sample and conjugate are incubated together for too long (length of time depends on how much antigen is present in sample), the conjugate can bind together all the antigen present and result in a false negative. Because the antigen is all bound to the conjugate, no antigen is able to bind to the solid phase as it flows past.

 
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